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Experts Explain Why Zhoushan City In China Had Blood Red Sky

china red blood sky

A blood-red sky recently appeared over China’s Zhoushan city, causing locals to worry. Read on to learn more about the natural phenomenon that resulted in China’s blood-red sky.

On May 8th, netizens on the Chinese social media platforms Weibo and Sina shared viral snatches of the crimson sky, with many questioning why.

According to several sources, the red color was especially intense around Zhoushan’s port areas.

WHAT CAUSED THE BLOOD RED SKY IN CHINA?
While internet speculation over China’s red sky has led some to speculate that it is a solar storm similar to the one that generated a crimson sky above China, Korea, and Japan in 1770, local authorities have informed citizens that this phenomenon is unrelated to solar activity.

According to local reports, the sky’s crimson appearance could have been created by the refraction of red light from a fishing boat gathering Pacific saury.

“It was foggy and gloomy in Zhoushan on Saturday, and it was drizzling at the time of the red sky, which might have been caused by the reflection of light from the low-level clouds,” according to a story in the Global Times.

“When the weather is favorable, more water in the atmosphere generates aerosols, which refract and scatter the light of fishing boats and create the red sky seen by the public,” the crew stated.

The crimson sky was not produced by any anomalies in solar activity, according to experts from the China University of Geosciences’ space physics research team in Wuhan, because solar and geomagnetic activity were both quiet.

A VIEW OF CHINA’S HISTORICAL BLOOD RED SKY
A blood-red sky has appeared in China before. According to livescience, the sky across China, Japan, and Korea became crimson on September 10, 1770, and the color lingered for nearly a week.

Several studies have been conducted on this historical occurrence in order to determine what caused it. Hisashi Hayakawa, a historian and astronomer at Osaka University in Japan, and his colleagues searched into historical texts from Japan, Korea, and other East Asian countries for mentions of aurora.

According to LiveScience, Hayakawa remarked that the long-lasting auroras were seen at low altitudes, and one of the causes for this could be a significant geomagnetic storm that created them.

“Considering this event was so enormous,” Hayakawa continued, “it would be realistic to find further events not just in East Asia but also in other low-latitude areas. As a result, the team is expanding their archival searches to include the Middle East.”

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